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*Nel corso della sua lunga carriera e nelle molte interviste rilasciate, '''Lynch ha sempre esaltato l’importanza della componente acustica''': nel cinema, nelle arti, nella vita. Sono molte le fotografie che lo ritraggono con le cuffie indossate, oppure appoggiate sul collo. '''Si immagina sordo''', in Twin Peaks, David Lynch. Si autoritrae così. Una sordità che non sembra identificarsi con un handicap e che non gli impedisce di parlare al telefono, di ricorrere a varie tecnologie e di condurre a pieno il suo lavoro. Un po’ come Kafka – ma senza tanti timori –, ipotizza e sperimenta l’'''innesto di organi di senso, protesi e dispositivi di comunicazione'''. È per questa via che il regista sembra cercare di trasformarsi in una “'''macchina acustica'''” capace non tanto di ascoltare e comprendere, quanto di '''sentire le interferenze''' tra i diversi livelli seriali che sfruttano l’etere e il ciberspazio. È dunque dal punto di vista del suo orecchio – proprio in quel timpano e grazie al gioco di manopola con il quale regola il volume dell’apparecchio acustico – che tanto il microscopico nucleare quanto il macroscopico interstellare si rendono ugualmente esplorabili, nell’intensità. (Francesco Zucconi, [http://www.fatamorganaweb.unical.it/index.php/2017/07/30/sordita-di-david-lynch-twin-peaks/ ''Sordità di David Lynch''], 30 luglio 2017)
 
*Wherever we are, what we hear is mostly noise. When we ignore it, it disturbs us. When we listen to it, we find it fascinating. (John Cage)
 
*Carel Struycken’s character – described as The Giant in those previous iterations, but referred to as The Fireman in The Return – directs FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper to ‘Listen to the sounds’. Speaking in the unsettling backwards dialect familiar to viewers of the series, The Giant indicates a repetitive, scratching phrase from a gramophone. The instruction is clear and though Cooper can hear only noise, he appears to understand before disappearing in a fizz of what sounds like electricity. These opening moments of the latest incarnation of director David Lynch and writer Mark Frost’s groundbreaking television series demonstrates a playful approach to the relationship between what is said, what is shown and what is heard and understood by characters – and ultimately the audience – in the Twin Peaks universe. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Frances Morgan argues that Lynch uses noise to augment reality in order to ‘create atmospheres of disquiet and liminality’. In an interview with Chris Rodley, Lynch described his use of these sonic atmospheres as ‘presences’ that he defined as ‘the sound you hear when there’s silence, [the space] in between words or sentences’. Our paper explores these Lynchian ‘in between’ spaces and argues that it is not the spaces themselves that are important, but the interconnectivity between liminal or threshold places, where components of the soundtrack and the visual representation supplement one another in order to provide guidance to the viewer navigating the complex narratives of The Return, and how through these spaces evil is present. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*The Return is distinguishing the visual and sonic rendering of real world and extra-dimensional spaces [...]. [These] sonic ‘presences’ help distinguish different spaces for the audience, and also provide clues as to the different characters within the narrative. The sonic rules established here remain consistent throughout the season and are evident in the use of processing and effects applied to dialogue and bodily movement of the characters, in the deployment of both pre-existing source music conveyed non-diegetically in the sound track and through the diegetical performances of acts within venues situated within the narrative, and, finally, in the musical score written specifically by Lynch, composer Angelo Bad-a-lamenti and supervising sound editor Dean Hurley. What is most striking about The Return is how sound design is privileged throughout: dialogue is often secondary or entirely absent, there is barely any music in the first few episodes and it is the often expressionistic sound design that provides subtext, tone and narrative information. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Yet Part 8 of Twin Peaks: The Return appears to link the very real, very physical, historical first atomic explosion with the birth of evil, or an evil, into the world. As the bomb explodes across the screen, we are led on a visual journey reminiscent of astronaut David Bowman's trip through the stargate in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. The explosion is presented as a beautiful visual event on screen, but is accompanied by the sound of Krzystof Penderecki's discordant and atonal composition 'Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima' and within the slow motion technicolour explosive mayhem we see the spirit BOB floating. In The New York Times Noel Murray suggested that 'we just witnessed something like the origin story for the modern saga of good versus evil that "Twin Peaks" has been telling since 1990'. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Significant to the narrative of Twin Peaks: The Return are the many portals or gateways that join the extra-dimensional spaces of the season. These portals represent ruptures in space and time, and lead characters to specific locations – the Black and White Lodges, The Glass Box, Dutchman’s Lodge, or The Fireman’s residence. Where characters move from these extra-dimensional spaces to the real world, it is sonic cues that indicate their arrival or departure. This is evident in the group of Woodsmen who appear around a convenience store, brought into being by the Trinity atomic bomb test. The Woodsmen appear in a flurry of what the close captioning describes as a ‘warbling static stuttering’. This same sound cue announces their presence around the ‘zone’ that surrounds a vortex in a trailer park in Part 11, and where they are revealed to be lurking in the corridors of a Police Station. Here sound design effectively serves as leit motif, where non-diegetic audio cues remind the audience of the significance of the Woodsmen’s presence as carriers or conduits of evil forces between real and extra-dimensional spaces. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Lynch appears to wilfully make use of sound as a catalyst for the audience to forge their own connections with narrative events occuring on screen. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*HOOLIO DESK RI VAN describes Lynch as a filmmaker who privileges the psychological dimension of sound rather than the representational, and argues that it is sound design that can best serve to link abstraction with representation. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Brooke McCorkle argues that sound in The Return marks a shift from previous seasons – in that it is often ‘hyper-rendered not just for an ephemeral “jump scare” moment, but rather [is] in service of the story and/or the overarching aesthetic of the Twin Peaks world’. A core part of this aesthetic rendering of the world is that it becomes ‘real’ only in certain spaces. McCorkle focuses on electricity, something that has fascinated Lynch throughout his career, and which she connects to the manner with which the nature of evil is presented within the season – ‘like electricity, she says, the evil is transitory or, to put it better, transmigratory’.
*Dean Hurley explained in an interview that electricity is written into the script of Twin Peaks: The Return, and that his bespoke library of electricity sounds ‘became a defining signature of the show’. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
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