Differenze tra le versioni di "Utente:SunOfErat/Sandbox2"

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==Forensic fandom==
*Characters seemed to undergo dramatic transformations between episodes, to shift from good to evi) with only the most minima) waming. The narrative abounded with cryptic messages, codes, and chess problems, riddles and conundrums, dreams, vi-sions, clues, secret passages and locked boxes, shadowy figures peering through dark windows and secondary narratives appearing in the televised soap (Invitation to Love) that forms a backdrop to the first season's action. All of these details invited the viewer's participation as a minima) condition for com-prehending the narrative and even closer consideration if one had any hopes of solving the compelling narrative hook, "Who killed Laura Palmer?" (or WKLP, as netters started to cali it). The program's coming attractions, with their split second shots and mis-matched sounds, mandateci the use of the VCR as an analytic tool, required that the image be frozen, frame-advanced, and watched severa) times. The coming attractions became yet another puzzle that could be eagerly controlled by Lynch's ever-dwindling number of hardcore fans. (Henry Jenkins, Do You Enjoy Making the Rest of Us Feel Stupid? alt.tv.twinpeaks, the Trickster Author and Viewer Mystery, in David Lavery (a cura di) Full of Secrets, Critical Approaches to Twin Peaks Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1995, p. 55)
 
*Not surprisingly, these technically-oriented viewers embrace the VCR, like the computer, as almost an extension of their own cognitive apparatus. Sean Cubbitt has explored the ways that video technology allows the viewer greater mastery over the flow of images and thus allows the spectator to focus on aspects of the program material that solicit immediate interest. The net discussion was full of passionate narratives describing viewers' slow move-ment through particular sequences, describing surprising or incongruous shifts in the images. Some fans speculated that Lynch, himself, may have embedded within some single frame a telling due, planted there just to be located by VCR-users intent on solving the mystery [...] (Henry Jenkins, Do You Enjoy Making the Rest of Us Feel Stupid? alt.tv.twinpeaks, the Trickster Author and Viewer Mystery, in David Lavery (a cura di) Full of Secrets, Critical Approaches to Twin Peaks Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1995, p. 56)
 
*The computer net only intensified this process, allowing fans to compare notes. elaborate and refine theories through collaboration with other contrib-utors. All of the participants saw the group as involved in a communal enterprise. (Henry Jenkins, Do You Enjoy Making the Rest of Us Feel Stupid? alt.tv.twinpeaks, the Trickster Author and Viewer Mystery, in David Lavery (a cura di) Full of Secrets, Critical Approaches to Twin Peaks Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1995, p. 57)
 
*The technology of the net allows what might previously have been private meditations to becaome the basis for social interaction. (Henry Jenkins, Do You Enjoy Making the Rest of Us Feel Stupid? alt.tv.twinpeaks, the Trickster Author and Viewer Mystery, in David Lavery (a cura di) Full of Secrets, Critical Approaches to Twin Peaks Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1995, p. 58)
 
*The netters hoped that Twin Peaks would be "full of secrets": that it would provide fodder for their speculations for years to come. For these fans. the computer had become an integral part of their experience of the series and the many fan meta-texts that circulated on alt.tv.twinpeaks were as compelling as the aired episodes themselves. The computer provided a way of linking their own, admittedly obsessive, fixation upon Twin Peaks' enigmas to a broader social community of others who shared similar fascinations and frustrations. Participating in this virtual community became a way of increasing the inten-sity and density of those speculations, of building up other fans' explorations and expanding upon their theories. Both the mode and content of this television talk originated not only within the complexities of Lynch's text but also within the traditions and interests of computer culture. (Henry Jenkins, Do You Enjoy Making the Rest of Us Feel Stupid? alt.tv.twinpeaks, the Trickster Author and Viewer Mystery, in David Lavery (a cura di) Full of Secrets, Critical Approaches to Twin Peaks Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1995, p. 66)
 
==Narrazione==
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