Differenze tra le versioni di "Utente:SunOfErat/Sandbox2"

:- può infine assumere caratteristiche acustiche astratte, non più riconducibili per associazione a oggetti reali.
Ognuna delle polarizzazioni descritte può in realtà coesistere all’interno di una stessa manifestazione, così come coesiste nella realtà della percezione uditiva (di fatto il cervello umano seleziona in condizioni diverse solo alcune informazioni sonore e grazie all’uso di tecnologie di ripresa e riproduzione può anche scegliere quale aspetto morfologico privilegiare). Ora, la scelta del regista di presentare allo spettatore un determinato tipo di conformazione acustica del bordone diventa un elemento di comunicazione che influenza tanto il visibile quanto il verbale. (Maurizio Corbella, "[http://www-3.unipv.it/philomusica/annate/2007/comunicazione_audiovisiva/corbella/index.html «Il Club Silencio». Alcuni aspetti dell’uso del sonoro nel cinema di David Lynch]", in Philomusica Online, vol. 6, n. 3, 2007.)
 
*[...] silence in a Lynch movie never automatically connotes absence, just as sound is not to be confused with presence. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 180)
 
*Lynch's approach to diegetic sound thus reveals nvo important inversions of cinematic convention. One of these is a challenge to the assumption that foregrounded sound is a signifier of narratively important events or cues; an increase in volume does not necessarily equal an increase in signification, and what it does mean often remains emphatically unclear. The second reversal of film sound principles is based on what R. Murray Schafer calls schizophonia, that is, the separation of sound from its origin by means of record-ing technology.29 Because sound is assumed to proceed from a physical source, listeners automatically search for the materia! body that generates the sounds they hear; this is a natural reflex that governs sonic perception, but Lynch undermines it when in effect "there is no band." The obfuscation of causal relationships between source, sound, and signification engenders cognitive dissonance in audiences, a dissonance that operates in 'the danger zone' of the Lynchian uncanny. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 180)
 
*eerily nostalgie reputation. Badalamenti's scores usually contain a small number of traditional elements, such as the occasionai stinger for stare effects or leitmotifs tied to certain persons or situations. These well-known techniques are employed so unconventionally, however, that instead of being inattentively heard signifiers that pertain to on-screen events, as in traditional films, they draw attention to their own floating evasiveness. This is partly due to Badalamenti's ability to capture in music the frigh-tening yet enticing dreaminess of Lynch's films. By means of references to the music hall (Eraserhead), to classica' Hollywood film music (Blue Velvet), or to popular music of the 1950s (Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart), Badalamenti creates moods of nostalgia for times that lie etemally locked in the part. Within this sentimental framework, the simultaneous presence of long, sustained synthesizer chords and endlessly looped, nonlinear drones provides continuai warnings that tranquillity can be deceprive. The ambiguity of Badalamenti's extra-diegetic music is increased by the ways it is used within the context of film narrative and visual imagery. By letting leitmotifs migrate among differen characters and situations,30 by underscoring scenes with foreboding drones, and by avoiding an over-use of stinger effects, Badalamenti's scores for Lynch films undermine and gradually dismantle the unwritten rules of film-musical signification. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 181)
 
*Diegetic and extra-diegetic music in Lynch's work follow procedures similar to those that govem his visual and narrative rechniques. Tuming up the volume on seemingly meaningless diegetic sounds, questioning ideas of musical embodiment, ignoring the traditional signífying functions of extra-diegetic music—all of these add a sonic dimension to the uncanny sfumato of over- and under-signification that determines Lynch's cinematic style. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, pp. 181-182)
 
*Besides challenging cinematic rules regarding musical signification, Lynch's soundtracks also contribute to the overlap of realities in his films. The alienat-ing effect of many scenes is achieved by a music-induced conflation and blurring of representational and experiential levels. This musical boundary blurring becomes most explicitly evident in scenes that have to do with dreams. Like Roy Orbison's «In Dreams" as sung by Ben in Blue Velvet, diegetic music in Lynch's films often refers to dreams. But much of the diegetic singing—like "In Heaven" as performed by the Lady in the Radiator in Eraserhead—happens in dreams. These Iinks between music and dreams are indicative of the reality-altering qualities that they share in Lynch's films: having a dream and listening to music, each in their own way, evoke a highly immersive alternate realiry. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 182)
 
*Melodies and motifs unexpectedly turn up, posit their commentary on the on-screen events, and then vanish into the air just as suddenly as they appeared. In this Tight, it is no wonder that Lynch describes music as a "drug" or a "door'; music can provide a passageway beyond mediation, signification, reality, time, and space, and this is exactly what his trans-diegetic use of film music effects. Roaming all the layers of diegesis and extra-diegesis, Lynchian soundtracks rake film characters and viewers alike into the twilight zone that I ies "''inside'' a dream." (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 185)
 
*Sonic sfumato, schizophonic, trans-diegetic—the rhree main characteristics of Lynch's sonic style are epitomized in his approach to timbre. Timbre is the one musical parameter that cannot be caught in words or even in musical scores. is the most dreamlike of all musical qualities; the moment you try to describe it, it fades away. It refuses description, allowing only the vague approach of adjectives: dark, light, raw, angelic. Interestingly, it is precisely the indescrib-able "grain of the voice"39 (whether this voice is human or instnimenral) that expresses the themes in Lynch's work most poignantly. Since it lacks rhythm, melody, and harmonic progression, timbre is the only actual quality of the white noise that is Lynch's foremost sonic trademark. His soundtracks are conceived as thick textures in which acoustic sounds are mixed into the background and made fuzzy by an overlay of white noise. The timbre of this white noise can best be described by metaphors of air blowing through meta( pipes, or the whirring of elettrical cables, or the sound of wind in trees. It travels through all the diegetic, extra-diegetic, and meta-diegetic timespaces of his films. It is heard in room tone, all through Eraserhead, under the fan in Twin Peaks, at the trailer park in Fire Waik with Me (1992), in Fred Madison's flat in Lost Highway, in the taxi to Club Silencio in Mulhollmul Drive, in the rooms behind the door maiked "Axxon H" in Infami Empire. (Isabella Van Elferen, "Dream Timbre: Notes on Lynchian Sound Design", in James Wierzbicki (a cura di), [https://books.google.it/books?id=NAiB35WxARcC Music, Sound and Filmmakers: Sonic Style in Cinema], New York, Routledge, 2012, p. 185)
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