Differenze tra le versioni di "Utente:SunOfErat/Sandbox2"

 
*Se da un lato le capacità del sound design tendono a ricercare la massima efficacia ''realistica'', nello stesso tempo l’evoluzione del linguaggio audiovisivo sta ulteriormente ampliando e ristrutturando il proprio apparato ''convenzionale''. Il suono diventa un territorio grazie al quale sviluppare forme di costruzione peculiari: spazi narrativi, stati mentali soggettivi, ri-articolazioni della linearità narrativa, messa in discussione dello status di pura referenzialità di un suono ''live''. Inoltre gli apparati tecnologici impiegati dal sound design rendono sempre più esplicite le potenzialità ''iconiche'' del suono. Di fatto oggi un film si può già “vedere” ad occhi chiusi, ascoltando soltanto il sonoro. (Lucio Spaziante, "Immagini sonore: sound design, convenzioni audiovisive e costruzione della realtà", Studi Culturali, n. 1, 2013, pp. 18-19.)
 
 
 
 
*This article will argue that these sonic technologies, alongside more (audio)visual ones such as flickering fluorescent lights, videos, and the television sets that seem to only play the soap opera Invitation to Love, are crucial to the world of Twin Peaks, and constitute this world as both a communications network with portals to the unknown, and an accumulation of recordings of ghosted voices and entities, perhaps finding its ultimate expression in the backwards reprocessed speech in the Black Lodge. This lodge can be understood as a space in which there are nothing but recordings, albeit now on a cosmic, spiritual and demonic level. Using a media archaeological approach to these devices in the series, this article will argue that they were already operating by a media archaeological logic, generating the world of Twin Peaks as a haunted archive of sonic and other mediations. While focusing on the ways in which sonic technologies are presented in and disrupt the diegetic world of Twin Peaks, it is interested, beyond this, in the material constitution of the series as an artefact of analogue television at a specific moment of its technological and institutional development, a moment markedly different to the present. (Michael Goddard, "[http://sensesofcinema.com/2016/twin-peaks/sonic-technologies-in-twin-peaks/ Telephones, Voice Recorders, Microphones, Phonographs: A Media Archaeology of Sonic Technologies in Twin Peaks]", in Kirsty Fairclough, Michael Goddard, Anthony N. Smith (a cura di) "I'll See You in Twenty Five Years: The Return of Twin Peaks and Television Aesthetics", Senses of Cinema, n. 79, luglio 2016.)
 
*Perhaps the most fundamental media device in the series is that of electric light, the medium described by McLuhan as pure information, since it communicates nothing other than itself. Lynch’s trademark flashing, stroboscopic, malfunctioning fluorescent lights illustrate a key dynamic of the sonic technologies in the series, in that they only become perceptible through processes of breakdown which then serve their other unanticipated functions as portals to other worlds. (Michael Goddard, "[http://sensesofcinema.com/2016/twin-peaks/sonic-technologies-in-twin-peaks/ Telephones, Voice Recorders, Microphones, Phonographs: A Media Archaeology of Sonic Technologies in Twin Peaks]", in Kirsty Fairclough, Michael Goddard, Anthony N. Smith (a cura di) "I'll See You in Twenty Five Years: The Return of Twin Peaks and Television Aesthetics", Senses of Cinema, n. 79, luglio 2016.)
 
*{{NDR|Sui telefoni}} This underlines the noise inherent in every communication channel, which plays the role of the parasitic third party in Michel Serres’ sense. According to Serres, in any act of communication, there is always an uninvited parasitic third party, the uneliminable noise operative in any communication channel.11 Already in this first phone call two key forms of noise are therefore introduced into sonic communications – the noise resulting from calls not arriving at their destination but instead circulating within a network, and the parasitic noise of listening in, again diverting two way communication channels into a more ambiguous network configuration. (Michael Goddard, "[http://sensesofcinema.com/2016/twin-peaks/sonic-technologies-in-twin-peaks/ Telephones, Voice Recorders, Microphones, Phonographs: A Media Archaeology of Sonic Technologies in Twin Peaks]", in Kirsty Fairclough, Michael Goddard, Anthony N. Smith (a cura di) "I'll See You in Twenty Five Years: The Return of Twin Peaks and Television Aesthetics", Senses of Cinema, n. 79, luglio 2016.)
 
*This list of sonic devices does not exhaust all the sonic technologies deployed in the series, and more devices could have been engaged with such as the Double R diner’s aberrant jukebox, Gordon Cole’s hearing aid or even the log lady’s log, which similarly seems to inscribe significant events in a sonic form only audible to Margaret. Nevertheless, the sonic technologies discussed above are sufficient to demonstrate the manner in which they serve as portals to the black lodge. Indeed, the black lodge itself is, in a sense, nothing more than a network of recordings, the frenetic acting out of pre-recorded scenarios of characters who are in a kind of limbo, where they only exist as so many recordings or traces of their former selves. This is perhaps where Cooper inevitably fails, in imagining he can act heroically and morally inside a realm where everything has already been recorded, and thereby haunted and possessed, and there is no other option than to become yet another malevolent recording, as indicated in the final lines of dialogue: Cooper/BOB’s repetitive “How’s Annie?” In this demonic ending to the series, Cooper has become, not only reversed into BOB in the mirror he compulsively cracks his head against, but also a spectral and manipulated recording or simulacrum of his former self, which, like Edison’s demonstrations of his recording/playback device, is subject to manipulations and reversals that extend to a moral and spiritual level. This seems to clearly echo the “scandalous” statement that Kittler takes from Villiers de l’Isle Adam that “the soul is a notebook of phonographic recordings,”16 meaning that the inscription, storage, and transmission of vibrations enacted by phonographic devices becomes a perfect analogue for neurophysiological functioning in the era of technological modernity. In this final scene of the series, Lynch is perhaps making a similar point to the one demonstrated in the “Silencio” scene of Mulholland Drive: that the whole world of Twin Peaks, with its quirky characters and narrative events so adored by audiences, is only a montage of audiovisual recordings of pre-determined and pre-scripted statements and gestures, extracted from pre-existing cinematic and televisual models, repertoires and genres. These performances in turn are caught up in a haunted, spectral world, whose logic is already pre-determined and manipulated, and which speaks to us via the range of sonic devices discussed here, further remediated by the dispositif of television. (Michael Goddard, "[http://sensesofcinema.com/2016/twin-peaks/sonic-technologies-in-twin-peaks/ Telephones, Voice Recorders, Microphones, Phonographs: A Media Archaeology of Sonic Technologies in Twin Peaks]", in Kirsty Fairclough, Michael Goddard, Anthony N. Smith (a cura di) "I'll See You in Twenty Five Years: The Return of Twin Peaks and Television Aesthetics", Senses of Cinema, n. 79, luglio 2016.)
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