Differenze tra le versioni di "Utente:SunOfErat/Sandbox2"

*Brooke McCorkle argues that sound in The Return marks a shift from previous seasons – in that it is often ‘hyper-rendered not just for an ephemeral “jump scare” moment, but rather [is] in service of the story and/or the overarching aesthetic of the Twin Peaks world’. A core part of this aesthetic rendering of the world is that it becomes ‘real’ only in certain spaces. McCorkle focuses on electricity, something that has fascinated Lynch throughout his career, and which she connects to the manner with which the nature of evil is presented within the season – ‘like electricity, she says, the evil is transitory or, to put it better, transmigratory’.
*Dean Hurley explained in an interview that electricity is written into the script of Twin Peaks: The Return, and that his bespoke library of electricity sounds ‘became a defining signature of the show’. (Marshall Kingsley, Rupert Loydell, "Sound Design, Music and the Birth of Evil in Twin Peaks: The Return", Music and the Moving Image, 24-27 May 2018, NYU Steinhardt, New York.)
 
*Speaking in the unsettling backwards dialect familiar to viewers of the series, The Fireman directs FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper to ‘Listen to the sounds', indicting a repetitive, scratching phrase from a gramophone. The instruction is clear, and although Cooper can hear only noise - he appears to understand. These opening moments of the latest incarnation of director David Lynch and writer Mark Frost’s groundbreaking television series demonstrates a playful approach to the relationship between what is said, what is shown and what is heard and understood by characters – and ultimately the audience - in the Twin Peaks universe. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 1)
 
*Frances Morgan identifies that Lynch uses noise to augment reality in order to ‘create atmospheres of disquiet and liminality’ (2011: 189). In an interview, Lynch once rejected the term ‘room tone’ as a descripter of these sonic atmospheres in favour of his own characterisation of what he described as ‘presences’. Lynch defined these as ‘the sound you hear when there’s silence, [the space] in between words or sentences’ (in Rodley, 2005: 73). (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 1)
 
*I argue that it is not the spaces themselves that are important but how the interconnectivity between these liminal or threshold places – heard through the components of the soundtrack and shown through their visual representation define and dominate the complex narratives of The Return. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 1)
 
*Changes of camera position correspond with a subtle shift in room tone or ‘presence’, disquieting perhaps in Frances Morgan’s vernacular, but this use of sound situates Colby within the real world, perhaps protected from the inhabitants of extra-dimensional spaces by the glass walls of the box itself. When an alarm prompts Colby to change a memory card in one of the cameras, his movements loudly reverberate in the loft. Within these first three sequences of The Return this distinction in the visual and sonic rendering of the real world and extra-dimensional spaces establishes for the audience the conventions for the whole series. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 2)
 
*As these sonic ‘presences’ help distinguish different types of spaces for the audience, they also provide clues as to the different types of characters within the narrative. These sonic rules remain consistent throughout the series and are evident in the use of sound effects applied to dialogue and Foley, the deployment of both pre-existing source music, both non-diegetically and in the diegetic performances of acts within venues situated within the narrative, and in the musical score written specifically for the series by Lynch, and his collaborators composer Angelo Badalamenti and supervising sound editor Dean Hurley. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 2)
 
*What’s striking about Twin Peaks is how sound design is privileged throughout – dialogue is often secondary or entirely absent, there is barely any music in the first few Parts and it is the often expressionistic sound design that provides subtext, tone and narrative information.
*Sarah Nicole Prickett observes that even the close captioning of Twin Peaks: The Return shows the care taken in each spot effect, an unusually cinematic approach to sound, with ‘incredible, specific descriptors of sound and score. A line dialed by the Log Lady […] isn’t ringing but "trilling." Footsteps on tile in the Black Lodge are "odd reverberations." Skin "crinkles." In the anonymous woods are "whooshing sustains," followed by, naturally, an “ominous tone”’ (2017). (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 2)
 
*These portals represent rips in space and time, and lead characters to specifc locations the Black and White Lodges, The Glass Box, Dutchman’s Lodge, or the Fireman’s residence – a fortress situated over a purple ocean. Where characters move from these extra-dimensional spaces to the real-world, it is sonic cues that indicate their arrival or departure. This is best illustrated in the group of Woodsmen who are brought into being by the Trinity atomic bomb test on 1945 and who appear around a convenience store in a flurry of what the close captioning describes as a ‘warbling static stuttering’ in Part Eight.
This same sound cue or motif announces their presence later around a zone that surrounds a vortex in a trailer park, when they are revealed to be lurking in the corridors of a Police Station and in a prison cell adjacent to that holding a character who has been arrested for murder. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 3)
 
*Julio d’Escriván describes Lynch as a filmmaker who privileges the psychological dimension of sound rather than the representational, and argues that it is sound design that can best serve to link abstraction with representation (2009: 1). This primacy of spaces is a multi-dimensional palimpsest where sound and image collude to determine and distinguish the real, extra-dimensional and liminal spaces of Twin Peaks from one another, and demonstrate the functioning of the portals that will allow for Agent Cooper’s eventual return to the real world from his Black Lodge purgatory. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 3)
 
*Jeff Wilser observes that silence is also deployed in interesting ways. In the opening titles of Twin Peaks: The Return Badalamenti’s theme tune begins a full 12 seconds after the opening shot - what Wilser describes as ‘an uncomfortable stretch of stillness’ (2017). This, coupled with the lack of cues from the original score in the first three Parts, caused some critics to speculate that Lynch was deliberately distancing The Return from previous iterations of Twin Peaks. Sarah Nicole Prickett notes that this lack of music, coupled with Lynch’s predilection for abstraction, extended use of cinematic silence and elongated shot lengths, finds time move achingly slowly in those early Parts (2017). (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, pp. 3-4)
 
*The powerful use of silence that Wilser observes at the start of the title sequence is replicated throughout the season, most unusually in dialogue scenes – a rarely deployed device in television, which favours exposition. In an example from Part 17, Gordon Cole – played by Lynch - tells his fellow FBI Agents to ‘listen to me,’. But then he pauses for ten very long seconds before explaining to them the intricacies of the negative forces at work in Twin Peaks. These periods of intensified silence, coupled with the use of barely audible or manipulated dialogue and the presence of a number of characters who are either mute, incomprehensible, or only able to repeat the dialogue delivered by others, furthers a sense of awkwardsness and disorientation. Where characters are unable to hear, listen or understand what is being said to them, the audiences attention is directed to pay attention to other sonic cues within the narrative for their information. With the reduction of music over the course of the season, and with little dialogue in many of the Parts, so sound design is required to do much of the narrative heavy lifting. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 4)
 
*Dean Hurley explains that Lynch’s practice involves the introduction of ‘music into sound and sound into music where everything blurs’ what he calls an ‘omni-lateral understanding of all aspects of film’ (in Amorosi, 2017). This notion of omni-laterality, or the representation of all points of view, resonates with the larger meaning of The Return defined by its multiple dimensionality and coexisting timelines where anything can, and does occur. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 4)
 
*This sparing use of score in the opening three Parts makes the use of diegetic source music in The Return all the more striking. Handpicked acts close the majority of the episodes by playing to the residents of Twin Peaks in The Bang Bang Bar, the Roadhouse venue familiar from earlier iterations of the series. The resultant performances provide the opportunity for the audience to decompress, escaping Cooper’s existential stasis and return to the town to spend time with those still resident there. Andreas Halskov argues that these sequences are one of only a handful of markers of seriality, in a seasons which otherwise ‘radically subverts our expectations of television storytelling and causality’ (2017). By having the bands perform under their pro-filmic names each of these musical sequences has a disturbing secondary effect, situating the fantastical events of the season in the present day and, in doing so, bringing Cooper’s murderous doppelganger and the mysterious Woodsmen into our world. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 4)
 
*Deviating from the conventional is, in part, how Lynch moved from a noun to the Lynchian adjective and, as sound designer for The Return, he continues in a career-long avoidance of the familiar. This is made manifest with editing techniques such as jump cuts and glitching being as evident in the sound design as they are in the visuals. His divergence from familiar practices of continuity are evident in unusual spaces. In those opening scenes of Part One, sound bridges that traditionally serve to link a visual transition from exterior and interior spaces are missing. The first exterior wide shot of the Great Northern Hotel in Twin Peaks shows both the visual and sonic representation of a waterfall outside, but a visual cut to the interior of the hotel is accompanied by a similarly sonic cut – the abrupt silence of the hotel manager’s office divorces it from the previous shot and its location. The result is a subtle sense of the uncanny, where even real and familiar spaces feel divorced from their surroundings. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 5)
 
*Brooke McCorkle argues that sound in Twin Peaks: The Return marks a shift from previous seasons – in that it is often ‘hyper-rendered not just for an ephemeral “jump scare” moment, but rather [is] in service of the story and/or the overarching aesthetic of the Twin Peaks world’ (2017). core part of this aesthetic rendering of the world is that it becomes ‘real’ only in certain spaces. McCorkle focuses on electricity as an example, something that has fascinated Lynch throughout his career, and which she connects to the manner with which the nature of evil is presented within the season – ‘like electricity, the evil is transitory or, to put it better, transmigratory’ (2017). Electricity is everywhere in our world but rarely physically manifest. It is an invisible power and binding force that links real-world locations with extra-dimensional spaces and timelines. (Kingsley Marshall, "Sound and Music Use in Twin Peaks: The Return", Sound and Storytelling, 2018, Dodge College, Chapman University, Los Angeles, USA, p. 5)
14 269

contributi